Wreck-It Ralph 2012

Wreck-It Ralph is the 9-foot-tall, 643-pound villain of an arcade video game named Fix-It Felix Jr., in which the game's titular hero fixes buildings that Ralph destroys. Wanting to prove he can be a good guy and not just a villain, Ralph escapes his game and lands in Hero's Duty, a first-person shooter where he helps the game's hero battle against alien invaders. He later enters Sugar Rush, a kart racing game set on tracks made of candies, cookies and other sweets. There, Ralph meets Vanellope von Schweetz who has learned that her game is faced with a dire threat that could affect the entire arcade, and one that Ralph may have inadvertently started.

Ralph Breaks the Internet 2018

Video game bad guy Ralph and fellow misfit Vanellope von Schweetz must risk it all by traveling to the World Wide Web in search of a replacement part to save Vanellope's video game, "Sugar Rush." In way over their heads, Ralph and Vanellope rely on the citizens of the internet -- the netizens -- to help navigate their way, including an entrepreneur named Yesss, who is the head algorithm and the heart and soul of trend-making site BuzzzTube.

Ralph Wolf and Sam Sheepdog 1953

Ralph E. Wolf and Sam Sheepdog are characters in a series of animated cartoons in the Warner Bros. Merrie Melodies series of cartoons. The characters were created by Chuck Jones, but here directed by Isadore Freleng. This short was written by Melvin Millar and features music by Carl W. Stalling. Ralph Wolf has virtually the same character design as another Chuck Jones character, Wile E. Coyote—brown fur, wiry body, and huge ears, but with a red nose in place of the Coyote's black one; white eyes instead of Wile E.'s yellow; and, occasionally, a fang protruding from his mouth. He also shares the Coyote's appetite, and persistent use of Acme Corporation products, but he covets sheep instead of road runners and, when he speaks, doesn't have the upper-class accent or the egotistical bearing of the Coyote. Another crucial difference is that of personality: Ralph does not have the fanatical drive of the Coyote in pursuing his prey, preferring to abandon his chase at the end of the working day. Sam Sheepdog, by contrast, is a large, burly Berger de Brie with white or tan fur and mop of red hair that usually covers his eyes. He very rarely runs and tends to be sedentary in his movements. He does, however, possess sufficient strength to incapacitate Ralph with a single punch once he catches him.

Friday Night! with Ralph Benmergui

Friday Night! with Ralph Benmergui was a Canadian television variety show, which aired on CBC Television from 1992 to 1993. In its first season, the show aired at 10 p.m., following Prime Time News. In its second season, it aired at 11 p.m. The show debuted October 30, 1992, and was hosted by Ralph Benmergui, formerly of Midday. The house band provided the music; they were replaced in the second season by Look People, led by Jaymz Bee. It was one hour long and had an American late-night talk show format: an opening monologue by Benmergui followed by comedy sketches, guest interviews, and musical performances. Notable guests on the show included Céline Dion, Leonard Cohen and hockey legend Don Cherry. The show was a ratings failure from the beginning, capturing only one-third of the audience that the CBC had in its timeslot the previous year. The critics were not impressed, either; one segment featured real TV scribes reviewing the program, mostly unfavourably, while it was still in progress. The show was nonetheless renewed for a second season, but moved back an hour. The first episode of the 1993-94 season aired right after the Toronto Blue Jays won the World Series and the Liberal victory in the 1993 Canadian federal election: the opening bit showed Joe Carter's series-clinching home run flying into the stands and hitting outgoing Prime Minister Kim Campbell in the head. "Jays won...Tories lost...cool!" said Benmergui.

The Greatest American Hero 1981

The chronicles of  teacher Ralph Hinkley's adventures after a group of aliens gives him a red suit that gives him superhuman abilities. Unfortunately, Ralph, who hates wearing the suit, immediately loses its instruction booklet, and thus has to learn how to use its powers by trial and error, often with comical results.